the series that’s slapping some sense into australians

As a fan of Tsiolkas’ book The Slap, I was rather concerned and quite apprehensive about its migration to the small screen. After all, so many adaptations of late have been subpar (think the latest Dorian Grey, Jane Eyre and Eat, Pray, Love).

In my eyes, the intimacy created between reader and character through knowing what each and every character in the book was thinking, was the book’s strongpoint. Its binding matter if you like. So, naturally, I wondered about how the integrity of this was going to be maintained on television. Aside from the use of voice overs, which are rarely employed effectively, I wasn’t sure that this transition could be achieved without sacrificing the book’s subtleties. Also, each page of the book had something simmering under the surface. The book was so much more than the words on its pages (I know, sounds impossible but just think about it). Something altogether mysterious and uncomfortable and, at times, outright upsetting was happening with every turn of the page. That couldn’t possible be conveyed on television. Could it?

image by anslatadams

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5 books that have kept me breathing

image by jordianne

Every now and then I find myself feeling quite nostalgic and reminiscing on the past few years or so; on the people I’ve met, the adventures I’ve been on and the things I’ve learnt… in books! Today I thought I’d share with you my 5 great book loves. These are the books that have kept me alive, afloat and breathing. These are the books for which I live. Continue reading

respect: not a large / meaningful / great enough word

The term ‘hero’ today means something vastly different from what it meant back in the era of the Ancient Greeks (think Hercules) or – if you don’t fancy stretching your mind back that far – even not so long ago, in the era of my parents or grandparents. My grandmother’s hero was her mother; my grandfather’s his father; my aunty’s her father. In fact, even my hero growing up (and I think it’s safe to say my sister’s also) was my aunty. All a far cry from today’s Shane Warnes, Lady Gagas and Justin Biebers don’t you think?

image by Ben Northern

The values that ‘hero’ encompassed prior to the Facebook-Twitter-Myspace revolution were far more primitive and real than those that it encompasses today. Mobile phones were scarce or even non existent, and the internet was still a far off thought way, way, way in the back of someone’s mind (I know, can you imagine?). And so, all my grandmother’s and mother’s generations had to model themselves on and look up to, were the other people who they knew and saw frequently; the people who they were surrounded with. Their heroes were people of a similar calibre (and life form!) to them. Continue reading

on gratitude

A little over a month ago I went to a panel discussion at the Melbourne International Film Festival (MIFF) on adapting Christos Tsiolkas’ The Slap for television. The discussion was both fascinating and confusing with at least three or four clashing opinions on how best to adapt a written work for the screen. There came a point in the discussion though, when a member of the audience commented on one of Tsiolkas’ characters – Manolis – in relation to how The Slap presented what it means to be Australian. In response, Tsiolkas voiced some ideas that spoke to me on a very personal level.

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ditching my freedom for a trip to the tropics

Those of you who follow my blog will probably be wondering whether I’ve finished reading Franzen’s Freedom – and the answer is yes, I finished it last night. What did I think?

I was impressed without being blown away. The Corrections had set me up for another masterpiece and although Freedom probably is a masterpiece in comparison to the works of other similarly contemporary writers, compared to The Corrections, it fell just short for me. But, as my husband was ever so quick to remind me every time I opened my mouth to utter, “but it’s not The Corrections,” –  I shouldn’t compare because no, it isn’t The Corrections, it’s Freedom. And the idea of freedom (whatever it means today), it most definitely explores. Continue reading